We are excited to reveal plans for the redevelopment of one of Whitefriargate’s most prominent buildings. The former HSBC bank in Hull is to provide a thriving home for us at Social Profit Calculator along with our partners at Pagabo and Sypro.

Behind its prodigious historic facade, 55 Whitefriargate oozes an eclectic mix of heritage and creativity. Combining high-tech workspaces with break-out areas to connect and play – in the centre of Hull’s Old Town. 

This restored bank is to be a hub for creative, digital and tech businesses; housing communal co-working and flexible office space, where innovators can collaborate, share and grow together.

Creating opportunities 

Our executive chairman Gerard Toplass said: “This building is a prime example of why you should never look down when you are in Hull. You should always look up to make sure that you don’t miss any of the city’s truly tremendous architecture – including this striking Grade II listed Victorian building.

“We’re really excited and proud to have revealed plans for Hull’s former HSBC building. Being one of the city’s oldest streets, Whitefriargate backs onto the old town and is a fundamental part of Hull’s heritage. 

55 Whitefriargate, Hull
One of Hull’s grandest examples of Victorian commercial architecture. Stone-fronted, with rusticated ground floor, carved heads above the ground-floor windows, pediments elsewhere, and fluted Corinthian pilasters. By Lockwood & Mawson, 1878-79, for the Midland Bank. Grade II listed.

Photo © Stephen Richards (cc-by-sa/2.0)

“There has been a lot of residential development happening in Hull and the surrounding areas, which will no doubt attract new businesspeople to the city. We want to support the local community by creating opportunities for individuals and businesses to thrive, as well as further cementing Hull as a hub for local, national and international businesses to both grow and succeed.”

Upskilling our staff

Gerard continued: “Another fundamentally important element that we hope 55 Whitefriargate will provide for companies is a space to train and upskill their staff via ‘learning’ days. We believe that it’s important for modern-day employers to be able to offer their workforce opportunities for self-growth and personal development on their own premises, and we believe that this new facility will do just that.

“It has been great working alongside local contractors and Hull City Council to bring our vision to life, and I would like to personally thank them for their ongoing support.”

Join us

Lettings are being managed by Garness Jones, with high initial demand seeing the entirety of the ground floor space already fulfilled. Space and flexible terms remain available for the building’s first, second, third and fourth floors.

For more information about 55 Whitefriargate or to register your interest, please click below:

Transforming the hard to understand into easy to implement, enabling social value learners at any level to fuel their pursuit. Bringing together private and public sectors to discuss, collaborate and learn how to promote innovation and deliver more social value.

On Wednesday 21st July, we will be hosting our “Simplifying Social Value” webinar in partnership with Built Environment Networking where we aim to dispel some of the myths and confusion that surround social value.

Procurement and frameworks expert Gerard Toplass, our Executive Chairman, will host a panel of industry leaders to discuss the real drivers behind social value and why it lies at the heart of all procurement.

Key speakers include our CEO Tom Farley, our Principle Consultant Dr Victoria Johnson, with Lord Bob Kerslake, and delegates Martin Summers and Andrew Craig joining from GK Strategy, and Maven.

Topics will include:

  • ESG Investing
  • Commoditising Social Value
  • Social Value in Infrastructure
  • Social Value in Training
  • Social Value in the Private Sector 

Our panel will also help to clear up common misconceptions that social value is a costly and difficult journey.

Gerard explains, “The importance of collaboration cannot be understated and events like these offer a great platform for like-minded professionals to come together and drive the industry forwards.”

The event will be taking place online at 9am on Wednesday 21st July.

Not to be missed!

To secure your free spot, please click below

Purpose drives performance, helps retain talent and creates long term value for your customers. But what’s yours? Do you have one? And why does it matter? 

Milton Friedman’s iconic essay, “The Social Responsibility of Business Is To Increase Its Profits,” was published over 50 years ago and remains just as polarizing today as it was five decades ago. Friedman introduced the theory in 1970 in an essay for The New York Times. He argued that a company has no social responsibility to the public or society; its only responsibility is to its shareholders. He goes on to justify his views by considering to whom a company and its executives are obligated.

Whilst “Shareholder theory” has undeniably had a significant impact on the corporate world, there is a contrary declaration that’s moving away from such an exclusively shareholder-focused perspective. It suggests that the purpose of business is to deliver value to all company stakeholders, spanning beyond the narrow shareholders’ circle; that it is now time to redefine what it means to be a successful company in the 21st century.

As business faces an accelerated change of pace, they are at the same time experiencing increasing consumer expectations that are reshaping the responsibilities of organisations.  Demands from a new generation of employees for purpose in their work is bringing about wider debate concerning the role business should play in society.

The goal of all businesses is of course to make money, but could it possibly be true that those that have a purpose beyond profit tend to do better?

In a study titled “The Business Case for Purpose”, a team from Harvard Business Review together with EY’s Beacon Institute reported that “in those organizations where purpose had become a driver of strategy and decision-making, executives reported a greater ability to deliver revenue growth and drive successful innovation and ongoing transformation.” And, “Those companies able to harness the power of purpose to drive performance and profitability enjoy a distinct competitive advantage”.

The study defines purpose as “an aspirational reason for being which inspires and provides a call to action for an organisation and its partners and stakeholders, and provides benefit to local and global society”.

A declaration of this kind signals a welcome shift in mindset in doing business in general and highlights a change in corporate culture.  Could much of the corporate world be starting to unite under this common principle? Are we ever going to row in the same direction?

For meaningful transformation, it’s critical that purpose be embedded in the heart of the business. Establishing clarity about purpose, values, and the business model makes it work in practice. This may mean putting a social or environmental purpose as the core driver of the business. For others, it may mean delivering social impact alongside commercial goals. 

Whichever direction, it needs to be deeply embedded, so that businesses have a legal commitment to social purpose and in turn can reap the benefits of a more sustainable approach in the long term.

2020 was a turbulent year. Most of us alive today have seen nothing like it. From a global pandemic that upended the lives of virtually everyone on the planet to the recurrence of natural disasters that confirm just how much we have betrayed nature to the changing face of both work and wellbeing.

Whilst the last 12 months will cast a shadow stretching far beyond COVID-19, we have the opportunity to make some dramatic changes. Here are some of the challenges that now undoubtedly demand our attention.

Climate change has a new urgency

To meet the global climate goal established by the Paris Conference of net zero CO2 equivalent emissions by 2050, we need to cut emissions in half by 2030, which is about a seven or eight percent reduction a year.

Accounting for climate change vulnerabilities

Climate change has become an investment consideration impossible to ignore. With natural disasters growing in frequency and intensity, and global financial regulatory activity gaining momentum, investors are waking up to the implications of climate change. There is increasing acknowledgement that climate risk equals investment risk. This awareness is changing the shape of future investments, with environmental, social, governance (ESG) becoming a core criteria for investors, leading to new opportunities for people, products and services that provide a boost to the planet, as well as yield profitable results.

Climate change and the construction industry

The building and construction sector play a central role in the shift towards a low-carbon economy. The sector’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions account for approximately 40% of global GHG emissions (WBCSD 2018). The major contributors to these emissions are the materials used as well as the heating, cooling, and lighting of buildings and infrastructure.

The construction sector should take care to manage climate change challenges actively and take responsibility for its direct or induced carbon emissions.

Consumers appeal that purpose surpasses profit

Whilst the concept of purpose-led business is nothing new, profit with purpose is set to become the new norm. With rising pressure from millennials (now making up more than 40% of all consumers and influencing about £30billion in annual sales), it’s perhaps becoming clearer that business cannot thrive in a world where people don’t.

More support than ever to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals

There are a huge number of resources out there for companies looking to brush up their knowledge of the goals, and advance toward the UN’s ambitious targets set by 2030.

SDG Academy, an online platform of free educational resources compiled by some of the world’s leading sustainability experts. Plus, the SDG Action manager, a free tool that walks you through the process of assessing your own performance toward the SDGs, including gaps in performance and suggestions for improvement. 

The concept of wellbeing has taken on new meaning

Even prior to the pandemic, a focus on individual health and wellbeing was set to be a major agenda. However, with the stress and instability created by the pandemic — plus the sudden remoteness of managers from their teams — the duty of care between companies and their employees has taken on a whole new dimension of importance, especially in relation to mental health and health inequalities.